Explore Holy Taco

25 Vintage Racist Ads

racist ad

There was a time when ad executives didn’t want to use cavemen and boobs to sell everything – they felt the best way to demonstrate the usefulness of their product was by peppering ads with a healthy dose of ignorance and racism.   The world’s a zany place.  Anyway, let’s peruse some ads that these companies would probably wish they’d rethought if they’re still around.

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

racist ad

21 Responses to "25 Vintage Racist Ads"

  1. Pateasuelos says:

    Someone could tell me whats wrong with Aunt Jemima and Uncle Remus?

    Those images seems fine to me.

  2. Tyler says:

    The Van Heusen ad was funny.

  3. Wilford Brimley's Monkey says:

    #6: I didn’t know it was considered racist to depict a well-dressed southern gentleman speaking southern accented english.

    #9: depicts a US serviceman, supposedly during WWII when the US had GIs stationed in various foreign ports. What is racist about that ad? the fact that there is a black woman dressed in indigenous tribal-style jewelry carrying fruit? I don’t get it? There are no african women street fruit vendors?

    • Ian Fortey says:

      #6? You mean Uncle Remus? Seriously?

      • Wilford Brimley's Monkey says:

        “by the mid-20th century, however, the dialect and the “old Uncle” stereotype of the narrator, was considered demeaning by many blacks, on account of what they considered to be racist and patronizing attitudes toward blacks. However, Harris’ work was an extraordinarily accurate account of the stories he heard from the slaves when he worked in a plantation as a young man. He listened to, and memorized, the African American animal stories told by Uncle George Terrell, Old Harbert, and Aunt Crissy at the plantation and wrote them down some years later: He later acknowledged his debt to them in his later fictionalized autobiography, ‘On the Plantation’ (1892). Many of these stories that he recorded have direct equivalents in the African oral tradition, and we owe it to Harris that he remembered them and wrote them down, thereby preserving them in their African-American form.”

  4. DonkeyXote says:

    That Van Heusen one is harsh! xD

  5. ididafunny(dot)com says:

    Wrong on so many levels

  6. Ian Fortey says:

    Uncle Remus, while not busy lynching anyone, and the old Aunt Jemima ad, both portray what is essentially the perfect paradigm of the “black” stereotype, which is racist. That’s not a southern accent, that’s an ignorant stereotype of the way “uneducated colored folk” talk. It’s not a hate-filled form of racism, but it is just as ignorant.

    And maybe the issue with the Lifesavers and is it’s hard to read, but it’s rather racist and a bit misogynistic as well. Also delicious.

  7. Thundacunt says:

    DAMN!!

    some of those actually made me gasp! WTF General Electric!? TWO! TWO racist ass adds! and if you dont find the language of the “Uncle Remus” or aunt jemima adds offensive i bet a damn dollar you are the type of person who says “What? i’m not racist, some of my best friends are black” fairly often!

    • Rahm-Immanuel says:

      Don’t have a problem with #6, but I can see why some people would take offense, compared to the others though its mild.

  8. The "El Conquistador" says:

    While many would agree that this was/is offensive then how is it “OK” to be sexist just two posts down?

  9. Melanie says:

    I fucking love Lifesavers.

  10. RMCF says:

    These are great. You should have included the Coon Chicken Inn (http://www.opus-art.com/image_cache/9358_W350.jpg).